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DeniseD
28-07-2010, 03:24 PM
Hello,

I am new to tatting and I :heart: it. I would like to tat my own mantilla or chapel veil to wear to the Latin Mass I have been attending. Can anyone help me with a relatively simple (beginning) pattern. I have been looking for more then a week now and fear that it does not exist! :cry:

Thank you in advance.

-Denise

tatknot
28-07-2010, 03:29 PM
I don't know of any patterns, DeniseD. How big does it need to be and what shape? My first thought is that you should do it in mignonette stitch. Each row is a string of rings with empty thread between them. You join the next row to the empty threads of the previous row. You could finish it off with a ring and chain edging to stabilize it.

Others will be along shortly with other ideas and suggestions. Someone might even know of a pattern. Let us know what you come up with, please.

LadyDoc
28-07-2010, 04:27 PM
Remembering the little pieces of lace which we wore to mass in the 60s, perhaps a pretty doily pattern wold work.

DeniseD
28-07-2010, 06:40 PM
I would like my chapel veil to be a triangle shape - long enough to reach my shoulders and cover my hair which goes midway down my back. I could use the doily type of head-covering but I tend to think those are more for little girls. Btw, I did go to Joanne's fabric and picked up a yard of crafters lace. I will tat an edge. That will keep me until I find some other pattern or design one myself. I will let you know how that goes.:cool:

IcePrincess
29-07-2010, 08:28 AM
I was about to suggest you embroider a fine fabric with an edging and tatted flowers or something. I've used chiffon for an evening shawl following a 1915 pattern.

A mantilla or chapel veil made entirely of tatting probably is best done by using some patchwork patterns, Jane Eborall has some of these for example, there also is a booklet by Adelheid Dangela but I don't know where it's available in the US. A little warning here - in my humble opinion it does not look good to work up lace fabric from tatting unless you use fine thread, size 60 or finer. Adelheid did herself an all lace stole in size 80 thread, worked on it for two entire years. And she is an experienced and fast tatter.

tatknot
29-07-2010, 04:08 PM
I was about to suggest you embroider a fine fabric with an edging and tatted flowers or something. I've used chiffon for an evening shawl following a 1915 pattern.

A mantilla or chapel veil made entirely of tatting probably is best done by using some patchwork patterns, Jane Eborall has some of these for example, there also is a booklet by Adelheid Dangela but I don't know where it's available in the US. A little warning here - in my humble opinion it does not look good to work up lace fabric from tatting unless you use fine thread, size 60 or finer. Adelheid did herself an all lace stole in size 80 thread, worked on it for two entire years. And she is an experienced and fast tatter.

Are you referring to Occhi-Patchwork, IcePrincess? Handy Hands and DS9Designs both have it available, possibly others. All of the patterns are diagram only.

IcePrincess
29-07-2010, 04:27 PM
As a matter of fact I was referring to "Occhi-Patchwork". I bought it from Adelheid directly, so I never cared about where you might buy it. She only mentioned that it is sold in the US but I didn't know if she had another title there.
What I love about it is, that you have so many possibilities of combining different designs and many different levels of difficulties. There are quite a number that are "beginner friendly" and some that pose a challenge.

tatknot
29-07-2010, 08:28 PM
I've seen a few of her motifs on some of the blogs I follow. All of her designs that I've seen are beautiful.

Maureen L
29-07-2010, 10:54 PM
This has been an interesting discussion - I've been looking for a mantilla pattern for ages, and I would never have thought of making one with patchwork motifs! I've thought of embellishing some sheer fabric, but I really wanted something more substantial - and I have that book!
Thanks, Denise D, for raising the topic.

Sonja
04-08-2010, 11:49 AM
There are a lot of doilies or snowflakes with six sites. You can combinate it to a 3-corner, as big as you like. Look at patterns from combinated doilies. A lot of them you can combinate to a shawl with 3 sites.

Imoshen
10-08-2010, 04:08 AM
Is this maybe what you were looking for? It's folded over but you can clearly see from the photo where you can shorten a motif to make that shape. This is from a french magazine called Frivolito's or maybe it's Spanish I can't really tell, but it's diagramed with no text.
6055

NettieJacobs
16-04-2012, 04:52 PM
I am also working on a Mantilla, both in Tatting and in Crochet. For the Tatted mantilla, I am using a simple circular motif and joining them together (R: 4-4-4-4, CH: 4-4-4), bringing it into a circle (join on 1st picot of the ring to last picot of previous) (7 sets) and then joinging then entire set on the last picot of the first and last ring) then tatting a pretty edge just as you would on a napkin or hanky, your choice. My dimensions for a rectangle are 21" x 42" and the edging should be at least a 2" pattern. For the Crochet, I am using the Lover's Knot for the body, then a 5 pedal Boulion stitch spray for the edging.

Lacetatting
16-04-2012, 04:56 PM
There is a piece in here, that has been used for that purpose...it is not from Adelheid's book, but it is in patchwork style and tatted in black...
Sonja knows it.....lol

http://www.intatters.com/album.php?albumid=853

BlueDode
16-04-2012, 06:45 PM
As I understand it, a mantilla is a triangular lace shawl. Some websites I've found show knitted triangular shawls as mantillas; some websites show Spanish examples that evelope the body and drag on the floor, longer than most bridal veils/trains.

That said, if you can't find a tatting pattern, consider using a scarf pattern as a guide for dimensions. Look at knitting, crochet, and other lace patterns as well. If there are other terms for a mantilla, such as "chapel veil", consider searching using those terms as well. You can look at old tatting patterns online at www.antiquepatternlibrary.org (http://www.antiquepatternlibrary.org) and some other sites. Check any local libraries, or even library loan if that is possible.

If you decide on edging a piece of linen with tatting, consider selecting an edging and tatting it first, then cutting the linen to a dimension matching your tatting. I think you need to look for a tatting pattern that has a corner: alternatively, you could tat a square motif for the corner and an edging for the sides.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help

kcabrera74
16-04-2012, 07:28 PM
The only requirement of a mantilla is that it covers both head and shoulders. It can be triangular, rectangular or semicircular. My great-grandmother's mantilla will brush the floor if worn with her peineta (mantilla comb - hers is very tall - and high heels) and it's done in Vologda lace. Teiko Fujito has a couple of very good shawl/mantillas in her book Tatting Fashion.

Sherongb
17-04-2012, 03:02 AM
Here's another idea: Think of some of the baby bonnets, and how they are made. Start with a doily for the back of the head. Perhaps find an insertion you like and make 2 or 3 rows of it, width to end up covering the back of your head, length - as long as you want it from the upper back of your head to where you want it to end. Instead of an insertion you could do motifs joining them into a rectangle.

Now: Work around the 2 longer and 1 shorter side of the rectangle, don't worry about 'turning a courner', let these strips form a natural U shape (like from one ear, over the top of your head, and down to the other ear). Continue to work strips building the top and sides of the cap from the back of your head to the front (as far forward as you want it to go). You can do an extra row around the bottom to tie the strips together.

The strips can be edgings, insertions or motifs put together into strips.

Just another take on it. Have fun with it.

Karen Bickerton
17-04-2012, 03:12 AM
Another possibility is to use netting underneath in the right shape and tat an edge and motifs to cover. This would allow you to use simple motifs, make it lacy, and make it substantial enough for regular use. Several of the reprints of tatting patterns have lace collars done this way, and it would require little adjustment in the shape of the netting underneath. I have done mantilla style veils for brides this way, and it has the advantage that once you have done the edging, you can keep adding motifs as you go, while still being able to use it. You can find both nylon and cotton netting--cotton netting is often sold as mosquito netting, but some of them are quite acceptable as a base for this type of work. You simply cut it to shape along the lines of the netting, check that it will not fray (finish the edge if this happens--nylon netting does not, but depending on how the cotton one is manufactured, it can. Then you can either work the edging straight onto the fabric, or tat it and attach. One other advantage is that should you decide later to join this by mingionette, you have it laid out, the shape of the spaces that need filled already done for you, and the tatting can be simply and easily taken off the netting as you go to finish a fully tatted veil. A variation on mingionette is rather than using the rings in each space, use a Catherine Wheel join--a single DS--which is a technique used in net making.